Thai Yoga Bodywork / Yoga Nexus

5 Points in a Thai Yoga Bodywork / Yoga Nexus by Bernie Gourley It was October of 2013 and I found my way to the Meditation Hall at the Fireflies Ashram off Kanakapura Road outside Bangalore’s southern sprawl.  That morning, I’d begin learning the sequence of actions of the Chiang Mai style of Thai Yoga Bodywork (TYB.) I would struggle to remember that sequence as I awkwardly groped about trying not to drive my thumb into the bones or nerve junctions of my fellow students. But over the course of those ten days, I progressed to the point that my awkwardness was less apparent, and I could get through the sequence without forgetting much. I’d arrived in India with a long list of activities to try and skills to learn as part of a plan of self-betterment. That TYB course was the first item on the list to be scratched off. I’d been in the country a little over a month.  The strange thing about that was that TYB was the activity farthest outside my comfort zone. I wasn’t a complete stranger to yoga or meditation when I arrived in India. And while I was new to the martial arts of Kalaripayattu and Muaythai, I’d practiced a Japanese martial art my entire adult life.  So while I wasn’t skilled at those arts, I had a level of transferable confidence to counterbalance my lack of skill. The same couldn’t be said TYB. It was all new. But that’s the magic of moving around the world, everything is outside your comfort zone, so you might as well go big or go home. Small world.  A couple years later, I’d be in that same Meditation Hall for the capstone weekend of my 500-hour yoga teacher’s course.  I remember lying in that Meditation Hall, resting after having learned the advanced cleansing practices (shatkarma) of hatha yoga. (By then there was an entirely new level outside my “comfort zone” as I’d purged my entire alimentary canal.) At any rate, the Fireflies Meditation Hall was just a piece of geographic connective tissue that linked my yogic and TYB educations. I’d like to discuss five more substantial links. 5.) Anxiety management:  Let me begin with a theme that I mentioned in my introduction. It’s an aspect of personal development that I’ve spent a lot of time working on recently, and that’s moving outside one’s comfort zone to dispassionately observe one’s anxieties.   Both Yoga and TYB present practitioners with opportunities to observe and tame anxieties in a safe way. In TYB, one’s anxiety might be about injuring the person one is working on, about doing a poor job, or it could even be just about touching strangers....

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Sense Of Contact & Flow – Thai Yoga Massage School, Mysore

Sense of contact and flow Touch is the first language mothers use to communicate with their babies. It is the only means to connect, love, share kindness and care. So, touch has been a very important means of communication to mankind. From a Thai Yoga bodywork practitioner’s point of view anatomical knowledge is important, but when it comes to “feeling” it’s a different dimension. The practitioner has to be aware of his/her own body first. Establish connection with the recipient. Apply techniques and pressure according to the condition of the recipient’s body. Smoothly translate from one posture to another. Listen to his / her own intuition.   The practitioners adopt some of the basic teachings of Buddhism in order to cultivate and deepen their massage offerings. There are four principles that form the basic inner stance, or attitude, of the practitioner during massage. Metta– loving kindness,  making offerings from our heart for the benefit of others Karuna– compassion and the appeal to reach out and ease suffering Mudita– joy for the joy and good fortune of others Upekkha– recognition of unity; interacting with others from a place of equality and equanimity The practitioner holds a powerful intent for the healing and this intent resonates deeply within the recipient too. The practitioner will be fully present, attentive, non judgmental and aware.  ...

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A Brief History of Thai – Massage at its finest

A Brief History of Thai – Massage at its finest

Thai Yoga Bodywork, Thai Yoga Massage, Thai Massage, Nuad Bo rarn (Ancient Massage), all refer to the ancient healing art that is said to have been pioneered by Jivaka Kumara Baccha, the thrice crowned King of Doctors. Jivaka and his role Jivaka Kumara Baccha is universally considered the father and pioneer of Thai Yoga Bodywork and his role began with his education in medicine and surgery at Taxila. He then became the royal physician for his patron Bimbisara, followed by his successor Ajatashatru, as well as the Sangha of Buddhist monks and nuns. According to Ananda Apfelbaum, in the book Thai Massage: Sacred Bodywork, Jivaka’s prowess in paediatrics, brain, and abdominal surgery was unparalleled, as was his knowledge of meditation and Yoga. It is believed that Jivaka combined his understanding of human anatomy and common ailments, and the benefits of yoga and meditation to outline the practice of the Ancient Massage. Subsequently, it is believed that the practitioners and the knowledge of the Ancient Massage reached Thailand through the people migrating between India and China, who then passed on this knowledge to the people who finally migrated to Thailand. It was popularised in Thailand as Nuad Bo rarn or Ancient Massage. The Ayutthaya Connection Ayutthaya was the ancient capital of the kingdom that would become the Thailand we know today and given the migration from China, the knowledge and practice of the Ancient Massage also followed and was popularised by the people and the royal court. While there is no real record that the teachings of Jivaka or the knowledge of Thai Yoga Massage was ever documented, it is accepted that the Burmese sacking of Ayutthaya in 1776 destroyed any possibility of recovering any documented text pertaining to the Ancient Massage. However, the healing art did thrive and became popular across the world after the Government of Thailand took over the administration of Thai Yoga Bodywork teaching and practice. Thailand and the Ancient Massage Such is the tourist interest in massage therapies in Thailand, that the Government of Thailand has set a target of 20 Billion Baht or US$ 560.389 Million per year in revenue from the spa businesses. Ancient Massage being a very important part of the offering of spas in Thailand contributes significantly to this figure. Thus, the Thai Government has also instituted an accreditation body that certifies practitioners and teachers of the Thai Massage. From then to now From the time of Jivaka Kumara Baccha, or Shivago Komarpaj as he is known in Thailand, to this day, Thai Yoga Bodywork has undergone a sea change – but only in the perspectives and the practice. The knowledge still dates back to the teachings of Jivaka and Buddha....

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The concept of Sen or Energy Lines

Everything you perceive, know and experience is a function of the universal life force energy. This life force – energy courses through our being, our consciousness, our soul.  The channels which carry the life force energy can sometimes be blocked or unbalanced causing discomfort or disease. The channels which carry the life force energy are referred as ‘Energy lines’ ‘Nadis’ or ‘Sen’. This is also the basis for all the healing arts as we focus on the energy movements, rather than just look at only the body for the answers. Thai Yoga Bodywork is no different. The picture describes the multitude of energy lines that traverse the length, breadth, and depth of the human body. The premise of Yoga, Acupuncture, Acupressure, Massage and other healing arts is, in fact manipulating the physical body to channel these energy lines.  It eases the flow of energy by removing the physical blocks. Thai Yoga Bodywork and the Energy lines or Meridians Thai Yoga Bodywork aims at stimulating the meridians through acupressure and assisted yoga, where the recipient is assisted by the practitioner in attaining the precise yogic posture that stimulates the channels, thus unblocking the energy flow throughout the body. Additionally, the massage techniques further enhance the efficacy of assisted yoga by targeting specific points along the meridians with pressure and movement. The benefit of a Thai Yoga Massage is derived principally, by the practitioner’s precise understanding of how the meridians can be channelized in order to direct the flow of the energy between the multitudes of branches of Sen. Learning the art The Inner Mountain School of Healing Arts (IMOSHA) Thai Yoga Bodywork course focuses on helping future practitioners understand the meridians as well as treating certain ailments associated with the blocking of these energy lines. This understanding, when combined with the understanding of meditation and yoga gives practitioners the ability to diagnose Qi blocks and unlock the recipient’s Qi...

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10 reasons to learn Thai Yoga Massage

10 reasons to learn Thai Yoga Massage

If you came here thinking you’d learn for yourself, think again – but if you came here because the first thing that came to mind was someone who might need this, you’re on the right path. Strike the right balance between the mind and the body with Thai Yoga massage. This ancient practice – dating back to 2,500 years – is a powerful healing tool that revitalizes the body’s energy systems. This exceptional Ayurvedic body therapy is based on the concept of life force or energy, which flows along specific channels in the body, called “Sen Lines” or “Prana Nadis”. A combination of yogic postures, meditation, acupressure and reflexology, Thai massage stimulates the pressure points in the body that open up blocked energy pathways, causing free flow of energy, which assists the body in healing itself. Some of the most remarkable benefits of this unique and powerful healing art are: Boosts immune system and detoxifies the body: Thai yoga bodywork stimulates the nervous system and relaxes the muscles thereby expelling toxins from within the body and improving blood circulation. An active immune system is crucial for actively fighting diseases. Increases blood circulation and lowers blood pressure The diverse Yogasanas used by Thai Yoga Bodywork can enhance the circulatory system in the body. While assisted yoga, unblocks the energy lines or the Sen, that in-turn improves circulation and reduces muscle and tissue damage occurring due to cramps and anaerobic respiration. Further, when the alternating pressure on the artery is applied, fresh oxygenated blood courses throughout the blood vessel, removing stagnant blood and toxins from the walls of the blood vessels. This, in turn, increases blood circulation and helps regulate blood pressure. Relaxes muscles and increases flexibility and mobility The stretching and application of pressure on extremities including the feet, hands, thumbs, knuckles and fingers, the muscle areas in the body relaxes and becomes more flexible. This effective healing therapy alleviates pain, stiffness, and improves the overall functionality of the joints. Relieves arthritis and back pain Thai massage regulates arthritis and back pain by warming up and relaxing muscles and improving the flow of blood throughout the body. If you are seeking an alternate method for relief from such conditions, fix an appointment with a certified Thai massage specialist for a successful and speedy recovery, or get your significant other to sign up for a Thai Yoga Bodywork Course and be rid of the pain for life. Prevents illness and alleviates degenerative diseases A strong immune system actively fights and destroys disease-causing pathogens. Thai massage has been seen to be has proven extremely effective in treating degenerative diseases and conditions as it boosts the immune system and releases blocked energy pathways....

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